Whiskey tariffs could be cut in trade deal with Australia

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Amid concerns that the deal with Australia could lead to the gradual introduction of zero tariffs, threaten the competitiveness of UK farmersIn addition to this, you need to know more about it., International Trade Secretary Liz Truss highlighted efforts to remove the 5% tariff on whiskey exports.

“A trade agreement between the United Kingdom and Australia would be important for Scotch whiskey and the Union”, said Truss. “Part of the promise to leave the EU was to strike deals with countries far beyond Europe, opening up new opportunities for iconic British products like scotch abroad. In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

“I am fighting hard to bring these tariffs down and get a deal that benefits Scottish producers and helps the whole of the UK.”In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

However, she stopped before promising that the tariffs would be removed completely.

Glenkinchie Distillery Supports Free Trade AgreementsIn addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Glenkinchie Distillery Manager Ramsay Borthwick said: “We pride ourselves on making the highest quality single malt whiskey which is exported to over 180 countries around the world under the Johnnie Walker Scotch Whiskey brand.In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

“Growing future global Scotch whiskey exports through free trade agreements that open up markets like Australia will benefit Glenkinchie, Johnnie Walker and the wider Scotch whiskey industry. “In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Scotch Whiskey Association Managing Director Karen Betts noted that exports to Australia have nearly doubled in the past 10 years and that the industry as a whole is eagerly awaiting a free-trade deal. exchange (ALE) to support this growth.

“The FTA is also an opportunity to strengthen the legal protection of Scotch whiskey in Australia and to improve its application”,she added. “Stopping those looking to take advantage of Scotch whiskey’s reputation for quality with counterfeit scotch is a priority for us in Australia, as it is in all of our export markets.In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Export market In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Australia is the eighth largest export destination for Scotch whiskey, valued at £ 113 million. In 2020, £ 125.8million of drinks – which included products such as whiskey – exported to Australia were subject to tariffs of 5%.

Commenting on the potential gains for food and beverage manufacturers, Exports Minister Graham Stuart said: “From whiskey to shortbread, Scotland offers a range of food and drink that many can enjoy and, thanks to the impending trade deal between the UK and Australia, more people than ever will be able to.In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

In addition to this, you need to know more about it.In addition to this, you need to know more about it.As we continue to reduce trade barriers and red tape, UK businesses and consumers can rest assured that they will benefit from any trade deals we sign with countries around the world. The 800 Scottish companies that exported goods to Australia last year are no exception and the others that join them will only showcase more of the best of Britain. “In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Reluctance for industry In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

Despite promises that the UK-Australia deal would benefit the agri-food industry, talks over zero tariffs have amplified fears about the detrimental and anti-competitive effects it would have on UK farmers.

Mark Lynch, partner of corporate finance firm Oghma Partners, expressed concern that UK producers would be at a disadvantage at scale and questioned whether the government could be trusted to subsidize livelihoods with direct payments.

The Food and Drink Federation has warned the government to keep in mind that some sectors of the broader food and beverage industry may be vulnerable to the complete removal of tariffs without quota limits, given the strategic importance of British production for food security and rural economies.

Meanwhile, lack of clarity regarding exports to the EUAnd a continuing shortage of sea containers continues to plague UK food manufacturers.



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