Platform: Spotlight on modernist residential architecture in Norway

Platform: Spotlight on modernist residential architecture in Norway

Modernist architecture was born at the beginning of the 20th century as response to large-scale changes in technology, construction and society; notably through the use of glass, steel and reinforced concrete. Style was generally associated with the function of buildings from an analytical point of view, the rational use of materials, the elimination of ornamentation, and the openness to structural innovation.

Paul Tung is a Norwegian screenwriter, director and cinematographer of Arthouse Films who has been involved in film production since the early 2000s. Having written, directed, shot and produced four independent films, as well as 3 documentaries, each of his projects has been presented at major film festivals on all continents, in galleries and various national cinemas and cinematheques.

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Tunge had produced two short documentaries on modernist architecture, Ad Astrafocusing on churches, and Bautaspotlighting brutalist corporate buildings, both premiering on the online cultural site Immediacy. After creating a spotlight on modernist architecture through the lens of these two projects, Tunge then followed up with Platforma meditative short film that explores modernist architecture in Norwegian housing from the late 1950s to the early 1990s.


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Featuring projects by Sverre Fehn, Geir Grung and Erling Viksjø, the film aims to build an avenue to make private architecture public, to experience a building and to feel the room, light, material and placement of its corresponding spaces. .

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Villa Holmes. Image © Christian Tunge

In this article, we will highlight some of the dwellings featured in the short film and how each of these architects contributed to the wave of prominence for the era of modernist residential architecture.

Erling Viksjo de Villa Ystgard (1957) contributed to the design of monumental buildings in Norway to an extremely notable extent. In search of modern forms of expression, Viksjø has strived to create a unique form of interaction between architecture and art, and in many of its buildings has succeeded in establishing an intimate connection between the two forms. of art, resulting in a coherent architectural sculpture.

Villa Furuland (1998) designed by Lundhagem is built on a site covered with moderately dense vegetation. The desire to keep all the trees in the center of the layout of the two L-shaped houses, separated by a long and thick wall arranged to form a sheltered atrium. The formal language of the building contrasts with the surrounding houses, and it is the dialogue of the dwelling with the existing trees that binds it to the place.

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Bjart Mohr. Image © Christian Tunge

Villa Bjart Mohr (1971) was designed by Bjart Mohr as a permanent residence for him and his family in the early 1970s. The project is well thought out and detailed, and the result is a succession of comfortable and well-lit spaces. Dividing the different areas of the house through the use of sliding doors offers the possibility of enclosing separate regions, as well as creating a complex open sequence of spaces. The garden also presents itself as a place of interest, employing Japanese inspiration, seeking contemplation and peace with its trellis and paved path, a stark contrast to the light, open lawns.

Built for a musician in 1990, Sverre Fehn Villa Busk looks like a romantic fortress, standing on the edge of a steep cliff; it has the appearance of a house made to accommodate a poetic sensibility. Similar to many of his projects, the house maintains a strong relationship with its environment, harmoniously blending modernity and regionalism. Due to these qualities, a sense of timelessness is brought to the residence.

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Villa Busc. Image © Christian Tunge

Jensen and Skodvin Villa Wormdal Haug (1991) is located on a site between the outer and central areas of the city. The area possessed rare qualities for a city plot: tall hardwoods, ash, maple and oak, combined with local topography offering pastoral views in three directions. The design of the house strives to emphasize the segregationist character of the place, turning its back on the urban, while the rooms benefit from selective and exclusive views of the trees and what, for a city, is an unexpected landscape, almost pastoral. .

from Lundhaguem Villa Ullern (1993) is perched on a site originally used as a communal sunbathing garden for the local community, alongside the remains of several beautiful features including a 30 meter long stairway leading up the hill, a retaining wall, a pond and two magnificent poplar trees. The house embodies a playful yet poetic sense of lightness, and the interior’s use of color and texture is consistently matched to the exterior of the house, almost erasing the transition from indoors to outdoors. ‘outside. Infused with a feeling of lightness and the blurring of the outside in means nature is brought into every space of the home.

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Villa Holmes. Image © Christian Tunge

Paul Tunge believes that film, society and media are all about information and learning, however, an attempt should be made to protect and highlight important pieces, providing a sense of presence and experience. to the architecture that just isn’t on the inside. his theory.

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Platform / Film by Paul Tunge. Image © Kim Hiorthoy

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