Eu tariffs – Rodda And Sons http://www.roddaandsons.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 09:36:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.roddaandsons.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-icon-32x32.png Eu tariffs – Rodda And Sons http://www.roddaandsons.com/ 32 32 South Korea will see a spike in milk prices amid worsening inflation https://www.roddaandsons.com/south-korea-will-see-a-spike-in-milk-prices-amid-worsening-inflation/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 05:00:08 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/south-korea-will-see-a-spike-in-milk-prices-amid-worsening-inflation/ Dairy prices are expected to rise further as the price of locally produced milk is expected to increase to as much as 500 won ($0.36) per litre, industry sources said on Tuesday. The Korea Dairy Committee, a private organization that oversees the fair distribution of raw milk, held the first meeting between dairy farmers and […]]]>

Dairy prices are expected to rise further as the price of locally produced milk is expected to increase to as much as 500 won ($0.36) per litre, industry sources said on Tuesday.

The Korea Dairy Committee, a private organization that oversees the fair distribution of raw milk, held the first meeting between dairy farmers and dairy companies on Tuesday to negotiate the price of raw milk for this year.

Even before the negotiation, the price of milk was expected to jump from 300 to 500 won to 2,700 to 3,000 won per carton.

Dairy farmers argued that they should raise the price of a liter of raw milk from 47 to 58 won since the cost of fodder for cows jumped 40 percent and other production costs also increased.

If the price of raw milk increases by 50 won per liter, the price of a carton of milk in the market would generally increase tenfold, sources said. In October 2021, when the price of raw milk jumped 21 won, Seoul Milk, the major dairy company, raised the price of a liter carton of milk by 200 won.

Dairy companies have accepted the price hike, citing rising production costs weighing on dairy farmers.

In August, Seoul Milk had already agreed to pay farmers more, from 1,110 won to 1,158 won per liter.

With milk becoming more expensive, it will likely push up the price of bread, ice cream and coffee, as well as butter, cheese, cream and other dairy products, adding to already rising inflation, have indicated sources.

In August, the price of processed foods jumped 8.4 percent year on year, outpacing the headline inflation rate, according to data from Korea Statistics.

The government promised on Monday that it would try to limit the rise in milk prices.

“We cannot give direct orders to dairy companies regarding prices. But we plan to ask them not to increase the price of milk, ingredients for other food products, as much as possible,” said Park Beom-su, deputy secretary of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and of Rural Affairs, during a briefing on Monday.

Park pointed out that the price consumers pay for milk doesn’t always increase tenfold over raw milk, citing a previous example where milk prices rose as much as raw milk.

But dairy companies argue that higher market prices for milk are inevitable.

“We recognize that rising food prices are already pushing up inflation. Nevertheless, the industry needs to increase the consumer price of milk, following the rise in the price of raw milk, to offset the cost,” said a dairy company official who requested anonymity.

In the long term, rising milk prices could hurt the competitive edge of domestic dairy companies, sources said.

From 2026, South Korea will impose zero tariffs on milk imported from the United States and Europe. Current tariff rates for US and EU countries are 9.6% and 9% respectively.

Even before the tariff waiver, the list of the country’s top 10 sterilized milks included milk brands from Poland and Germany – but not Korea – as of Monday, according to online tracking firm Danawa.

By Byun Hye-jin (hyejin2@heraldcorp.com)

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Did the UK benefit from Brexit? https://www.roddaandsons.com/did-the-uk-benefit-from-brexit/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 08:24:14 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/did-the-uk-benefit-from-brexit/ What are cookies As is common practice with almost all professional websites, https://cyprus-mail.com (our “To place”) uses cookies, which are tiny files downloaded to your device, to improve your experience. This document describes what information they collect, how we use it and why we sometimes need to store these cookies. We will also share how […]]]>

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Column: Can Europe save its industrial metal production sector? https://www.roddaandsons.com/column-can-europe-save-its-industrial-metal-production-sector/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/column-can-europe-save-its-industrial-metal-production-sector/ LONDON, Sept 14 (Reuters) – A massive and rapid deployment of renewable energy is at the heart of Europe’s drive to end its dependence on Russian fossil fuels. Solar energy will be “the linchpin of this effort”, according to the European Commission. The only problem is that the global solar supply chain is currently dominated […]]]>

LONDON, Sept 14 (Reuters) – A massive and rapid deployment of renewable energy is at the heart of Europe’s drive to end its dependence on Russian fossil fuels. Solar energy will be “the linchpin of this effort”, according to the European Commission.

The only problem is that the global solar supply chain is currently dominated by China, a dependency that will only grow if Europe continues to lose industrial metal production capacity at the current rate.

High electricity prices have already forced the closure of aluminum and zinc smelters and pose an “existential threat” to Europe’s entire metals supply chain, industry group Eurometaux warned earlier this month. month. Read more

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The message seems to be getting through, with European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen today promising a critical raw materials law to increase the bloc’s metal self-sufficiency.

But is it going far enough and is it already too late for some parts of the region’s industrial base?

Structure of the German baseload electricity market

THE METALS PARADOX

European aluminum smelters were among the first to close because they are energy-intensive plants, using electrolysis to convert alumina into metal.

But aluminum is one of the critical metals for decarbonization. One of its uses is in solar panels, with one megawatt of photovoltaic capacity requiring an average of 21 tons of metal, according to the European Aluminum Association.

Europe is now caught in the middle of this paradox, needing more aluminum to achieve its ambitions for solar capacity but lacking the available energy to produce enough aluminium.

Western Europe’s annualized aluminum production fell below three million tonnes for the first time this century and will fall further. The Dunkirk foundry in France, one of the largest in Europe, is the latest to announce a partial closure. Read more

The regional supply crisis has sent physical premiums skyrocketing, with European buyers currently paying around $440 a tonne above the London Metal Exchange spot price for the metal.

Imports have inevitably increased, including raw metals from China, or at least China’s bonded warehouse areas. The country exported around 60,000 tons to the Netherlands in the first half of this year, an unprecedented change in the normal pattern of trade.

The aluminum paradox has spread to the European zinc sector, where two major smelters have been shut down and others are adjusting their speeds as they try to weather peak periods. Read more

In truth, all production of industrial metals uses significant amounts of energy, more at the primary metal stage than at the stage of manufacturing the product in the chain. But everyone in the chain, from the foundry to the manufacturer, is to some extent affected by the drastic change in electricity prices in Europe.

Annual change in aluminum production in Western Europe annualized

CRITICAL METALS

European policy makers have become aware of the region’s critical mineral weaknesses.

“We cannot sleepwalk into another overreliance in a strategic area,” European Commission Vice-President Maroš Šefčovič told a commodity security conference in Prague earlier this month.

The Critical Raw Materials Act aims to accelerate the development of national metal processing capacity from mine to processing plant to recycler.

The key question, however, is which metals are considered “critical”?

So far, the European Commission has mainly focused on battery inputs for electric vehicles.

The European Battery Alliance, launched in 2017, has generated 110 major battery projects across Europe, according to Šefčovič. The Critical Raw Materials Alliance, launched in 2020, is an extension of the policy of securing metal supplies from new gigafactories.

The European Union’s list of critical minerals is therefore heavy on battery inputs such as lithium, cobalt and graphite and the esoteric members of the rare earth family used in electric motors.

Bauxite, from which aluminum is made, was added to the list in 2020, but that inclusion does not appear to have drawn the attention of policymakers to the plight of the aluminum smelters needed to produce the metal.

The European Aluminum Association has lobbied intensively against the proposed Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism, arguing that in its current form it will eliminate European capacity and increase the bloc’s dependence on imports .

This suggests a lack of common thinking within the Commission. If the bauxite value chain is truly a critical resource for Europe, it should include both smelters and manufacturers, who have their own beef against EU import tariffs.

GO GO…

Copper, nickel and zinc are not on the European list, although the United States considers these three metals critical.

The European Commission’s focus on metals of the future seems to have taken precedence over older metals which also need to decarbonise.

Silicon is on the EU list of minerals, but photovoltaic cells will not work without aluminum panels or copper to connect power to the grid.

The European Union must follow the United States and take a broader view of the metals it needs to meet its green ambitions, especially after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Russia has always been a major supplier of aluminum, copper and nickel to Europe, but is now a high-risk source after what it calls its “special military operation”.

The new instability of supply is one more reason for the European Union to strengthen its domestic capacities.

This should start with protecting what it already has rather than focusing exclusively on creating entirely new battery metal supply chains.

The 40 CEOs who signed their deal with Eurometals’ stern warning are calling for a series of emergency measures to protect against further shutdowns.

An overhaul of Europe’s power sector, also announced today by von der Leyen, should help, but further emergency measures are needed to avoid further metal shutdowns over the coming winter months.

Because aluminum has another lesson for European policy makers. Temporary foundry closures in the past have most often turned into permanent closures as the costs of reopening increase over time.

The opinions expressed here are those of the author, columnist for Reuters.

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Editing by;Editing by Elaine Hardcastle

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

The opinions expressed are those of the author. They do not reflect the views of Reuters News, which is committed to integrity, independence and non-partisanship by principles of trust.

Andy Home

Thomson Reuters

Senior metals columnist who previously covered industrial metals markets for Metals Week and was EMEA Commodities Editor at Knight-Ridder (later Bridge). He started Metals Insider in 2003 and sold it to Thomson Reuters in 2008. He is the author of “Siberian Dreams” (2006) about the Russian Arctic.

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EU monitoring mission to lead dialogue on GSP+ compliance in Kyrgyzstan https://www.roddaandsons.com/eu-monitoring-mission-to-lead-dialogue-on-gsp-compliance-in-kyrgyzstan/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 04:08:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/eu-monitoring-mission-to-lead-dialogue-on-gsp-compliance-in-kyrgyzstan/ EU monitoring mission to lead dialogue on GSP+ compliance in Kyrgyzstan AKIPRESS.COM – The European Union Generalized Scheme of Preferences Plus (EU GSP+) monitoring mission has arrived in Bishkek. On the occasion of the launch of the mission, the members of the mission met the Deputy Minister of Economy and Trade Veronika Isaeva. As a […]]]>

EU monitoring mission to lead dialogue on GSP+ compliance in Kyrgyzstan

AKIPRESS.COM – The European Union Generalized Scheme of Preferences Plus (EU GSP+) monitoring mission has arrived in Bishkek.

On the occasion of the launch of the mission, the members of the mission met the Deputy Minister of Economy and Trade Veronika Isaeva. As a beneficiary of GSP+ since 2016, Kyrgyzstan benefits from generous trade preferences and the complete elimination of customs duties on 66% of all products exported to the EU.

The main objective of the mission is to conduct a dialogue on GSP+ compliance with the Kyrgyz government as well as with local stakeholders, including civil society, businesses, trade unions and international partners. The dialogue will cover 27 international conventions on human and labor rights, climate and environment, and good governance.

In the margins of the mission, the annual EU-Kyrgyzstan human rights dialogue will take place on 15 September in Bishkek. During the dialogue, the parties will discuss the situation and the latest developments in the country with regard to respect for human rights, fundamental freedoms and good governance. It will bring together members of the EU mission and representatives of the various ministries and state agencies.

GSP+ is a special EU incentive for sustainable development and good governance that supports developing countries. In addition to meeting standard GSP eligibility requirements, GSP+ countries, including Kyrgyzstan, are required to ratify and effectively implement 27 international conventions. In return, the EU reduces its import duties to zero on more than two-thirds of the tariff lines. Kyrgyzstan is one of the nine countries in the world – beneficiaries of GSP+.

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bne IntelliNews – Czech protest organizers make a business out of it https://www.roddaandsons.com/bne-intellinews-czech-protest-organizers-make-a-business-out-of-it/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 15:55:07 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/bne-intellinews-czech-protest-organizers-make-a-business-out-of-it/ Organizers of last weekend’s large far-right rally in downtown Prague demanding the resignation of the Czech government and attacking NATO and the EU are also active campaigners against COVID-19 vaccines and masks , follow Kremlin talking points and appear to be running the protests as a private company, a Czech investigative journalist has revealed. Demonstrations […]]]>

Organizers of last weekend’s large far-right rally in downtown Prague demanding the resignation of the Czech government and attacking NATO and the EU are also active campaigners against COVID-19 vaccines and masks , follow Kremlin talking points and appear to be running the protests as a private company, a Czech investigative journalist has revealed.

Demonstrations in Prague’s Wenceslas Square drew a much larger than expected crowd of 70,000, demonstrating discontent over the worsening cost of living crisis, with inflation hitting 17.5% in July and soaring energy prices are already starting to translate into much higher domestic tariffs.

Far-right and far-left organizers and speakers at the ‘Czech Republic in First Place’ rally used this widespread discontent to protest sanctions against Russia, accuse the government of helping Ukrainian refugees more than ordinary citizens and attack NATO and the EU.

Prime Minister Petr Fiala has been criticized for saying the protest leaders were displaying “strongly pro-Russian positions”. He was accused of failing to see that many protesters were attending the rally out of genuine fear that he would not be able to afford the cost of heating this winter.

Although many of the protesters were ordinary people, the scale of the rally also highlighted the strength of extremist opinion in the country. Parliamentary elections last year saw 18% of votes cast for far-right and fringe anti-establishment parties, although only political entrepreneur Tomio Okamura’s Freedom and Democracy party made it to parliament, garnering 9 .5% and 20 seats in the 200-member parliament. . In addition, the Czech Communist Party, pro-Russian, narrowly crossed the 5% threshold to enter parliament.

The success of the fringe and extremist protest, and its exploitation of ordinary people’s grievances, has political observers worried ahead of what is expected to be a “hot autumn”, as the cost of living crisis deepens and the country organizes municipal and senatorial elections. later this month and presidential elections in January. The protest organizers have already called another protest on September 28, St. Wenceslas Day, while the unions will hold their own protest on October 8.

Since the protest, Czech journalists have been investigating Ladislav Vrabel, the protest’s main organizer, who describes himself as a freedom fighter against the government and the EU, and has warned of the “genocide of the unvaccinated”. during the COVID-19 pandemic. He also ran unsuccessfully in the parliamentary elections for the “Chcipl pes” platform, which blasted COVID-19 restrictions and vaccinations.

Both Vrabel and fellow organizer Jiri Havel are veterans of a feverish Czech anti-establishment conspiratorial subculture, fertilized by numerous disinformation sites. Havel’s Facebook profile features a photo of red and blue pills with a phrase “your choice?”, a reference to the cult film The matrix.

Now Vrabel and Havel have clung to popular unrest with rising prices to campaign against sanctions on Moscow and help Ukrainian refugees.

An investigation by Czech investigative journalist Lukas Valasek also revealed that Vrabel is bankrupt, with liabilities of CZK 3 million (€120,000) and 27 forced collection proceedings registered against him. Its protests website calls for donations, which organizers claim to use for the protests.

“Even 100 CZK [EUR4] is a contribution with which you can participate in the plan Czech Republic first! reads the site calling for the protest and linking to the Facebook profiles of Ladislav Vrabel and Havel on the main page.

According to Vrabel’s responses to Valasek and his colleagues at Actualne.czhis Serbian wife Bojana Vurdelja collected more than 0.5 million Czech crowns (€20,000) from these donations, which Vrabel said was used to organize the rally, adding that “other protests and various other events ” will follow.

The spread of disinformation online by the organizers and their portrayal as freedom fighters is “a lucrative way out of their dire financial situation”, Valasek said. bne Intellinews.

Valasek said that since the pandemic, there has been an apparent pattern of bankruptcy and “failed marginal people” manipulating “vulnerable groups of Czechs into believing they are saviors fighting in the name of their freedom.”

The Czech NGO platform Czech Elves monitors the host of disinformation websites written in Czech and has long pointed out that the actors spreading disinformation about COVID-19 are the same actors spreading disinformation about the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

These false narratives include portraying Ukrainian officials and its military as criminal and violent NATO-funded Nazis, and blaming the energy crisis for EU sanctions and climate policies.

“Social media algorithms play into the hands of these disinformants by spreading their lies to tens of thousands of people,” Valasak said, adding that targeted users also represent a pool from which Vrabel and others “draw attention.” ‘money in the form of financial contributions’.

“It’s an attractive way to earn money because if they were officially employed, their wages would be confiscated by bailiffs,” Valasek said.

Disinformation analyst Roman Maca has documented that pro-Russian activist Jiri Cernohorsky and Zarko Jovanovic, the Czech-Serbian presenter of pro-Russian television Raptor, are also deep in debt or in personal bankruptcy proceedings.

Besides unmanageable debts, all of these men also have in common pro-Russian views, a nationalist fervor for Czechia (or in Jovanovic’s case, for Serbia) and an alleged goal of protecting their compatriots from the establishment in time. of crisis.

“The growing social tension of many citizens will further nurture the environment ripe for similar manipulators,” Valasek said. He added that it is essential for the Czech government “to communicate better with people and to prevent them from seeking flavors from the merchants of fear”.

In recent weeks, NGOs have warned of the impact of the rising cost of living on vulnerable sections of the population, with pensioners and low-income families already struggling. Some 700,000 Czechs (about 6.4% of the population) remain trapped in endless enforcement proceedings, many of them facing debts that cannot be repaid in their lifetime.

Opposition parties accuse the government of doing too little too late to deal with the crisis, and they staged a vote of no confidence on September 1.

A recent survey conducted for Czech radio shows that 55% of Czechs distrust Fiala’s cabinet and some 70% are dissatisfied with the cabinet’s handling of the energy crisis. Most of the 70% are people who did not vote for the parties represented in Fiala’s cabinet. People aged 45 to 59 are most often among the dissatisfied.

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Government will be allowed to take profits from energy companies to help households under new EU plans https://www.roddaandsons.com/government-will-be-allowed-to-take-profits-from-energy-companies-to-help-households-under-new-eu-plans/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 01:30:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/government-will-be-allowed-to-take-profits-from-energy-companies-to-help-households-under-new-eu-plans/ The government will be empowered to skim windfall profits from energy companies to subsidize household and business bills under plans agreed by EU ministers in Brussels yesterday. Funding plans to help prevent power companies from going bankrupt were also approved in principle by EU energy ministers meeting in an emergency session yesterday. But EU ministers […]]]>

The government will be empowered to skim windfall profits from energy companies to subsidize household and business bills under plans agreed by EU ministers in Brussels yesterday.

Funding plans to help prevent power companies from going bankrupt were also approved in principle by EU energy ministers meeting in an emergency session yesterday.

But EU ministers could not agree on a Russian gas price cap – opting instead for a price cap on all gas imports, which many Brussels officials say is unworkable.

They also waived mandatory plans to conserve scarce gas and electricity. Environment Minister Eamon Ryan said conservation measures are likely to be voluntary and guided by price incentives.

The European Commission, which guides policy, has been tasked with drawing up detailed plans to skim excess profits and help fund electricity supply companies.

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Environment Minister Eamon Ryan (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys)

Those Commission plans could be ready by next Tuesday and energy ministers are likely to return to Brussels later this month to endorse these and other elements of a revised strategy.

Under the EU’s bargain plan, governments will be empowered to “skimme” excess revenue from wind, nuclear and coal-fired power stations that can currently sell their electricity at record prices determined by the cost of gas. This money would be used to reduce consumers’ energy bills.

Fossil energy companies should also pay a “solidarity contribution” – a summary of the meeting said.

Putin expected to divide us – he failed

“It makes sense to take some of that excess profit and recycle it back into households,” Ryan said.

He disputed some negative assessments of yesterday’s meeting, saying the measures agreed were helpful to Ireland’s number one priority to protect households and businesses from excessive gas and electricity bills.

“You can’t cushion the blow head-on. But these measures agreed by the EU, together with other measures to be taken by the Irish government, will help,” Mr Ryan said.

The environment minister said the final details of the energy saving plans would be presented by the Commission. “I don’t believe it will be done on a mandatory basis. I think what will be used is what our own regulator has suggested – you put ‘market signals’ in to help make that happen,” Ryan said.

The Green Party leader added that the ‘market signals’ were cheaper prices at off-peak hours and higher tariffs at peak times when the most expensive and/dirtiest energy sources were used to meet demand. demand peaks.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin is sure to smile as he watches EU leaders flounder. Photo: Sputnik

EU ministers also backed the Commission’s proposal to offer emergency funds to electricity companies facing increasing requirements for guarantees, and tasked the Commission with designing such measures. “Everyone is in a hurry to find a solution,” Swedish Energy Minister Khashayar Farmanbar said.

Czech Industry Minister Jozef Sikela, who chaired the meeting, said unity had been maintained. “Putin expected to divide us – he failed,” Mr Sikela said.

Vladimir Putin had warned that Moscow would cut off all supplies to Europe if a price cap was applied to Russian gas. Some countries that still receive Russian gas have said they are unwilling to risk losing that supply.

“If price restrictions were to be imposed exclusively on Russian gas, this would obviously lead to an immediate cut off of Russian gas supply,” Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto said.

Others worry that a general cap on gas prices in the EU would mean supplies going elsewhere.

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European imports of Ukrainian chicken soar after lifting of quotas, according to a French group https://www.roddaandsons.com/european-imports-of-ukrainian-chicken-soar-after-lifting-of-quotas-according-to-a-french-group/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 17:02:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/european-imports-of-ukrainian-chicken-soar-after-lifting-of-quotas-according-to-a-french-group/ Chicks are seen at a poultry farm in Pruille-le-Chetif near Le Mans, France, March 4, 2020. Picture taken March 4, 2020. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register PARIS, Sept 7 (Reuters) – The lifting of European Union tariffs on Ukrainian products has led to a surge in poultry imports that […]]]>

Chicks are seen at a poultry farm in Pruille-le-Chetif near Le Mans, France, March 4, 2020. Picture taken March 4, 2020. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

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PARIS, Sept 7 (Reuters) – The lifting of European Union tariffs on Ukrainian products has led to a surge in poultry imports that has benefited a single company rather than Ukrainian farmers, manufacturers said on Wednesday. French Poultry, asking that the temporary move not be renewed.

In June, the EU temporarily lifted tariffs to help the war-torn country and suspended quotas for Ukrainian agricultural products, including one for 70,000 tonnes of Ukrainian poultry a year.

Ukraine’s chicken imports into the EU jumped 54% year-on-year in the second quarter to around 52,000 tonnes, French poultry group Anvol said on Wednesday, forecasting a total volume for 2022 of between 130,000 and 180,000 tonnes.

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In France alone, the increase in the second quarter was 181%.

The heightened import competition comes as the sector is already suffering from soaring costs due to high grain prices and soaring energy prices.

“We got screwed,” Anvol vice-president Gilles Huttepain told reporters. “We agree to help Ukrainian farmers, but we don’t want to help just one company.”

Huttepain was referring to MHP, by far Ukraine’s largest poultry meat producer and exporter and the country’s largest food producer.

MHP’s operations are vertically integrated – from the production of feed grains and forage to hatching, processing and selling eggs, it says on its website.

In June, the chicken and grain processor said its poultry production capacity had been reduced to 80-85% of normal levels due to the conflict and it could not give a financial outlook for the year.

The increase in Ukrainian chicken exports to the EU is also linked to a drop in shipments to the Middle East due to the halt in maritime traffic on the Black Sea, the French group said.

Chicken imports into France were further boosted by a drop in local production after producers had to cull more than 19 million birds in the country’s worst bird flu crisis and stiff competition from cheaper sources. Imports from Brazil rose 122% in the second quarter, they said.

A Ukrainian chicken breast is sold for almost half the price of a French one, Anvol said.

EU customs exemptions on Ukrainian products are only valid for one year and the European Commission has said it reserves the right to impose additional duties in the event of damage to products from European producers.

MHP did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Reuters.

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Report by Sybille de La Hamaide; Editing by Elaine Hardcastle

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Ukraine to join EU free roaming zone https://www.roddaandsons.com/ukraine-to-join-eu-free-roaming-zone/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 15:43:30 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/ukraine-to-join-eu-free-roaming-zone/ BRUSSELS Ukraine is set to join the EU’s free roaming network after the partners signed an agreement on digital cooperation on Monday that paves the way for integration in telecommunications. Ukraine and the EU held the 8th meeting of the EU-Ukraine Association Council in Brussels with the participation of Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal, EU […]]]>

BRUSSELS

Ukraine is set to join the EU’s free roaming network after the partners signed an agreement on digital cooperation on Monday that paves the way for integration in telecommunications.

Ukraine and the EU held the 8th meeting of the EU-Ukraine Association Council in Brussels with the participation of Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal, EU Foreign Policy Chief Josep Borrell and European Commissioner for Foreign Affairs. enlargement Oliver Varhelyi.

“We have signed the Digital Europe program with a total budget of 7.5 billion euros (7.45 billion dollars) which includes very important digital technologies and also joins the roaming space in the EU”, announced Shmyhal at a joint press conference.

“We are now exploring solid options to fully associate Ukraine with our roaming zone in order to benefit from the same reduced rates between Ukraine and the EU,” explained Varhelyi.

He also added that if Ukraine’s telecommunications market integrates with that of the EU, it will be beneficial “not only for the markets but also for the population to be able to maintain contact”.

Once adopted, people traveling from Ukraine to the EU and EU travelers to Ukraine will be able to make phone calls, send text messages or use mobile data at no additional cost, as in EU member countries .

Shmyhal also thanked the bloc for allocating the first €1 billion ($99.1 million) tranche of the bloc’s €9 billion ($8.9 billion) macro-financial assistance package, who has been a “great help in these very difficult times” and said his country is looking forward to parts two and three.

During the meeting, the executive body of the EU and Ukraine agreed on the disbursement of a budget support program of 500 million euros (497 million dollars), promised by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, in April during a campaign – Debout pour l’Ukraine.

The aid will contribute “to housing, restarting education, helping the internally displaced and consolidating the agricultural sector”, Varhelyi said.

The EU and Ukraine have also signed cooperation agreements in customs and tax matters.

For his part, Borrell welcomed that the EU granted candidate status to Ukraine in June and stressed that Russian President Vladimir Putin’s intention to “colonize, destroy Ukraine” had ended “in instead of bringing it closer to Europe”.

He reassured Ukraine that the bloc would help “whatever the threat, whatever the blackmail Russia is exerting on us”.

“We will provide political, financial, monetary and military support for as long as it takes and as much as necessary,” Borrell said.

Since the start of the Russian-Ukrainian war on February 24, the bloc has provided a total of 2.5 billion euros ($2.5 billion) in military aid, including lethal weapons, as well as equipment personal protective equipment, first aid kits and fuel.

He also imposed seven sanctions packages, targeting, among others, President Putin and Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, banning the import of gold, oil and coal, as well as the export of luxury goods and advanced technologies, as well as the exclusion of Russian and Belarusian banks. of the SWIFT international payment system.

The Anadolu Agency website contains only part of the news offered to subscribers of the AA News Broadcast System (HAS), and in summary form. Please contact us for subscription options.

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Brexit LIVE: Wetherspoons boss explains how to make the exit work – Truss ready for EU talks | Politics | New https://www.roddaandsons.com/brexit-live-wetherspoons-boss-explains-how-to-make-the-exit-work-truss-ready-for-eu-talks-politics-new/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 06:43:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/brexit-live-wetherspoons-boss-explains-how-to-make-the-exit-work-truss-ready-for-eu-talks-politics-new/ Mr Martin, 67, rallied behind tariffs and “European protectionism” in a recent interview with the Sunday Times. The news comes as Liz Truss is considering a trip to Dublin for Northern Ireland Protocol talks, an issue which Brexiteer Ben Habib says could threaten “his entire job as Prime Minister”. In his interview, Mr Martin said: […]]]>

Mr Martin, 67, rallied behind tariffs and “European protectionism” in a recent interview with the Sunday Times. The news comes as Liz Truss is considering a trip to Dublin for Northern Ireland Protocol talks, an issue which Brexiteer Ben Habib says could threaten “his entire job as Prime Minister”.

In his interview, Mr Martin said: “One of the great things about Brexit is getting rid of the fucking tariffs. They didn’t do it! If you criticize the EU for its protectionism, it there’s an implied promise that you I’m going to do something different.”

The idea of ​​getting rid of tariffs to help ease the UK’s cost of living crisis has already been floated by outgoing Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government, but with the announcement of a new leader and Prime Minister , expected tomorrow September 5, the responsibility will be passed on to a new government.

Already, the Developing Countries Trading System (DCTS) aims to reduce tariffs on hundreds of everyday consumer goods in a bid to lower prices.

The government said this could include everything from clothes and shoes to tomatoes and olive oil.

However, the Prime Minister’s hopeful and likely winner, Liz Truss, has another Brexit-related issue she will want to tackle in her first days in office.

Officials are said to be organizing a trip to Dublin to try to sort out the issues surrounding the Northern Ireland protocol.

The Sunday Times reports that she will meet Irish Taoiseach Micheal Martin to try to ‘agree’ on the deal, which has seen Northern Ireland effectively separated economically from the rest of the UK.

Ministers are pushing forward the Northern Ireland Protocol Bill which would see the UK drop some of the terms of the deal, but the EU has hit back, threatening legal action.

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UK reduces tariffs on pet food imports from LDCs https://www.roddaandsons.com/uk-reduces-tariffs-on-pet-food-imports-from-ldcs/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 16:08:29 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/uk-reduces-tariffs-on-pet-food-imports-from-ldcs/ In order to provide products at a lower cost to UK consumers, the UK government is reducing tariffs on hundreds of imported products, including pet food and pet food ingredients, as it faces the post-Brexit trade ramifications. Launched earlier this month, the new Developing Countries Trading System (DCTS) goes further than the European Union’s (EU) […]]]>

In order to provide products at a lower cost to UK consumers, the UK government is reducing tariffs on hundreds of imported products, including pet food and pet food ingredients, as it faces the post-Brexit trade ramifications. Launched earlier this month, the new Developing Countries Trading System (DCTS) goes further than the European Union’s (EU) Generalized System of Preferences (GSP), according to UK International Trade Secretary Anne- Mary Trevelyan.

Since Brexit, the UK has operated with its own GSP, which is similar to the EU version. DCTS will replace the current UK GSP in early 2023, covering 65 countries. It benefits least-developed countries (LDCs) the most, by offering duty-free and quota-free trade with the UK. It also offers the same for up to 85% of eligible products from most low-income and lower-middle-income countries. The full list of all countries is available in Annex 1 of the DCTS Government Policy Response.

New program also aims to reduce bureaucracy

The scheme also simplifies rules of origin, which dictate how much of a product must be made in one country before being imported into the UK. The aim is to reduce red tape for importers, encouraging companies to import from developing countries. Whereas previously product-specific rules for pet food (under HS code 2309 – preparation of a type used in animal nutrition) had to meet stricter requirements, the DCTS allows for a change of tariff heading, without any processing requirement. The product-specific rule schedule for DCTS can be found here.

A second aspect for the pet food industry to consider is the concept of cumulation, which allows materials produced in one country to be declared as originating in a different country, as long as the end product has been processed beyond minimum levels. Currently, GSP recipients can only accumulate in certain territories, such as the EU, Indonesia, and India, to name a few. The new policy extends cumulation to LDCs, allowing them to develop value chains of up to 95 countries now and continue to export to the UK duty free.

The UK imported over a million tonnes of pet food in 2021

Specifically for pet food, dog and cat food packaged for retail sale is no longer included in the Standard Preferential Tariff and is assessed at 0% in the Enhanced Preferential Tariff and Global Preferential Tariff. As the UK continues to expand its policies with regard to the involvement of global trade, there is great potential for pet food from developing countries to now enter the UK market.

For perspective, in 2021 the UK imported 1.02 million tonnes of pet food under HS code 2309, with over half of that amount for retail pet food, worth US$1.6 billion and US$1.2 billion, respectively, according to the UN Comtrade database.

Sipra is a researcher and writer. He writes and edits articles on climate, environment, business and management for academic and industry publications, such as GreenBiz.

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