Eu tariffs – Rodda And Sons http://www.roddaandsons.com/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 02:20:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.roddaandsons.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-icon-32x32.png Eu tariffs – Rodda And Sons http://www.roddaandsons.com/ 32 32 Dark house: why Europe faces high energy bills in winter https://www.roddaandsons.com/dark-house-why-europe-faces-high-energy-bills-in-winter/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/dark-house-why-europe-faces-high-energy-bills-in-winter/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 16:09:49 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/dark-house-why-europe-faces-high-energy-bills-in-winter/ Breadcrumb Links Author of the article: Content of the article LONDON – European households face much higher winter energy bills due to a global spike in wholesale electricity and gas prices and consumer groups have warned the region’s most vulnerable could be affected by fuel poverty. WHY THE HIGH PRICES? Energy companies pay a wholesale […]]]>

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LONDON – European households face much higher winter energy bills due to a global spike in wholesale electricity and gas prices and consumer groups have warned the region’s most vulnerable could be affected by fuel poverty.

WHY THE HIGH PRICES?

Energy companies pay a wholesale price to buy gas and electricity, which they then resell to consumers. As in any market, it can go up or down, depending on supply and demand.

Prices typically rise in response to increased demand for heat and people turning on lights earlier in the winter, while those in the summer are typically lower.

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But prices have skyrocketed due to low gas storage stocks, high carbon prices in the European Union, low deliveries of liquefied natural gas tankers due to higher demand from Asia. , a less important gas supply from Russia than usual, low production of renewable energy and gas and nuclear maintenance outages.

European gas benchmark prices at TTF’s Dutch hub have risen by more than 250% since January, while German and French benchmark electricity contracts have both doubled.

HOW LONG CAN THIS LAST?

The winter heating season in Europe typically begins in October and wholesale prices are not expected to drop significantly for the remainder of this year.

Norwegian company Equinor expects the drivers of current gas prices to remain high through the fall and winter, said CFO Ulrica Fearn, adding that Europe’s second-largest gas supplier after Russian Gazprom would increase gas production where it could to meet demand.

A quick start of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline between Russia and Germany could help balance high gas prices in Europe, a spokesperson for the Russian Kremlin said.

Gazprom has completed construction, but will not start pumping gas to Europe until approval from a German regulator and commercial deliveries are not expected in the near term.

WHY IS THE RETAIL PRICE INCREASING?

Many energy providers have announced retail price increases in recent months, passing on a higher wholesale cost to consumers.

Wholesale costs can be a big part of an invoice. In Great Britain, for example, on a mixed bill (electricity and gas), the wholesale cost can be 40% of the total.

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Thus, when wholesale market prices increase significantly, suppliers may increase consumer retail prices.

Suppliers can purchase energy from the wholesale market on the day of delivery, one day in advance, and up to months or seasons in advance.

They should try to predict when the price will be cheaper and buy the right amount to meet the needs of their customers.

If suppliers don’t buy enough energy, they might have to buy more at a price that could be higher, depending on market movements. This year, prices have continued to climb all summer.

CAN SOMEONE INTERVENE?

Some governments have announced measures to try to ease the winter burden on households.

“EU law allows member states to apply safeguards, such as public interventions in pricing for the supply of electricity to energy-poor or vulnerable domestic customers, under certain conditions,” said one spokesperson for the European Commission.

Spain’s government on Tuesday adopted emergency measures to cut energy bills by redirecting billions of euros in extraordinary profits from energy companies to consumers and capping increases in gas prices.

The government plans to funnel some 2.6 billion euros from businesses to consumers over the next six months.

Greece will offer subsidies to the majority of its households by the end of the year to make energy costs more affordable, a government official said on Tuesday.

Italy plans to review the way electricity bills are calculated with the aim of cutting prices, two sources said on Tuesday, with retail electricity prices set to rise 40% in the next quarter.

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In Germany, energy prices are being debated ahead of the September 26 elections. Britain introduced price caps on the most widely used energy tariffs in 2019 to end what former Prime Minister Theresa May called “scam” pricing.

However, UK energy regulator Ofgem raised the cap on most used tariffs from 12% to 13% from October, after raising it in April due to high wholesale costs.

Ofgem says that without this increase in the cap, companies would not be able to continue providing energy to their customers and meeting their broader obligations.

WHAT CAN CONSUMERS DO?

In countries with many energy suppliers, consumers are encouraged to change supplier or at a cheaper rate.

Britain has around 50 suppliers due to a deregulated market, but smaller ones have less capital to cover their wholesale electricity purchases against soaring prices and some have gone bankrupt in recent months.

Regulators such as Ofgem are urging consumers to contact their energy supplier if they are having trouble paying their bills to explain when and how much can be paid.

Energy efficiency measures, such as better insulation, energy efficient lighting, and smart meters are also recommended, but may require upfront costs.

It is much easier to reduce energy consumption during the summer months.

(Reporting by Nina Chestney; additional reporting by Susanna Twidale in London, Stephen Jewkes in Milan, Vera Eckert in Frankfurt, Kate Abnett in Brussels; Editing by Veronica Brown and Alexander Smith)

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Xinhua’s Global Economic News Summary at 10:00 GMT, September 11 https://www.roddaandsons.com/xinhuas-global-economic-news-summary-at-1000-gmt-september-11/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/xinhuas-global-economic-news-summary-at-1000-gmt-september-11/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 10:30:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/xinhuas-global-economic-news-summary-at-1000-gmt-september-11/ ISLAMABAD – Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) has decided to resume commercial flights to Kabul, capital of Afghanistan, from September 13, the airline said on Saturday. “Pakistan’s official flag carrier will resume air operations to Kabul,” PIA director general Arshad Malik told Xinhua, adding that the first flight would leave for Kabul on Monday from the […]]]>

ISLAMABAD – Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) has decided to resume commercial flights to Kabul, capital of Afghanistan, from September 13, the airline said on Saturday.

“Pakistan’s official flag carrier will resume air operations to Kabul,” PIA director general Arshad Malik told Xinhua, adding that the first flight would leave for Kabul on Monday from the Pakistani capital of Islamabad. (Pakistan-Afghanistan-Flights)

– – – –

SANTIAGO – Chile began on Friday in its southern region of Magallanes the construction of Latin America’s largest project to produce synthetic gasoline from green hydrogen.

With an investment of US $ 51 million, the Haru Oni ​​project of the Highly Innovative Fuels consortium will use wind power and carbon dioxide extracted from the atmosphere to produce 350 tonnes of raw methanol as well as 130,000 liters of e-Fuel per year by the end of 2022, according to the company.

“This is the decade to make the economy carbon-free,” said Chilean Minister of Energy and Mines Juan Carlos Jobet, who virtually participated in the inauguration ceremony. (Chile-Green-Latin America project)

– – – –

WASHINGTON – The United States has submitted an initial offer to the European Union (EU) that involves a tariff quota system to resolve a three-year dispute over the steel imported from the block, Bloomberg reported on Friday, citing a person familiar with the situation.

US and EU officials will discuss the issue at the inaugural US-EU Trade and Technology Council meeting on September 29 in Pittsburgh, according to the report, adding that the initial US offer- United related only to steel and did not include aluminum shipments.

Tariff rate quotas allow countries to export specified quantities of a product to other countries at lower tariff rates, but subject shipments above a predetermined threshold to a higher tariff, according to the report. (US-EU-Steel rates)

– – – –

BRUSSELS – Despite a stronger-than-expected second quarter, clouds are still looming on the horizon and countries must remain vigilant in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and possible supply bottlenecks, a European Commissioner for the Economy Paolo Gentiloni said on Friday.

Speaking at a press conference following a meeting of the Eurogroup of euro area finance ministers, he also spoke of the risk of rising inflation across the Union European Union (EU), “which we consider temporary”. (EU-Economy-COVID-19)


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Brexit: EU warns no renegotiation possible as UK delays Northern Ireland border controls again https://www.roddaandsons.com/brexit-eu-warns-no-renegotiation-possible-as-uk-delays-northern-ireland-border-controls-again/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/brexit-eu-warns-no-renegotiation-possible-as-uk-delays-northern-ireland-border-controls-again/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 22:20:49 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/brexit-eu-warns-no-renegotiation-possible-as-uk-delays-northern-ireland-border-controls-again/ Britain said on Monday it was again delaying the implementation of border controls on goods traveling to Northern Ireland. Brexit Minister David Frost said the government would continue to trade “on the current basis”, maintaining the grace periods the UK granted itself after breaking away from the economic embrace of the ‘EU at the end […]]]>

Britain said on Monday it was again delaying the implementation of border controls on goods traveling to Northern Ireland.

Brexit Minister David Frost said the government would continue to trade “on the current basis”, maintaining the grace periods the UK granted itself after breaking away from the economic embrace of the ‘EU at the end of 2020. He has not set a new end date for the pardon. periods.

Frost said the status quo “will provide space for possible further discussions” with the EU over the two sides’ deep differences over the Brexit divorce deal.

London and Brussels have been at odds over the Northern Ireland protocol since the UK’s divorce from the bloc came into effect on January 1, 2021. The UK province remains within the EU’s customs unions, which means that checks must be carried out on certain goods traveling between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK.

British authorities – including Prime Minister Boris, who renegotiated the Withdrawal Agreement after taking over from Theresa May at Downing Street – are now lambasting the arrangement as absurd as it effectively creates a border in the Irish Sea. They called for a “total overhaul” of the agreement.

“We will not accept a renegotiation”

The EU, which applies zero tariffs between Member States, says controls are necessary to safeguard its single market, remains firmly convinced that no physical border will be erected between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, fearing that this could lead to an outbreak of sectarian violence.

But he granted a “grace period” for the implementation of the protocol and agreed to extensions. A grace period on exports of chilled meats between Britain and Northern Ireland expires on September 30.

London has in the past said it wants the current arrangements to last until 2023, which Brussels has refused, even taking legal action against the UK over the protocol before suspending them in July in order to “find lasting solutions “.

The European Commission said Monday evening that it “takes note” of the latest British statement, signaling that “we will not agree to a renegotiation of the protocol”.

“We continue to stress that the Withdrawal Agreement is an international agreement. The Protocol is an integral part of the Withdrawal Agreement and the solution agreed between the UK and the EU to the problems caused by Brexit for the Island of Ireland Both parties are legally bound to fulfill their obligations under the agreement, “the Commission statement added.

Brussels also said it “reserved its rights in infringement proceedings” but was not moving forward “for the moment” with the next stage of the procedure which it had interrupted in July or opened new ones. offenses.

Irish Deputy Prime Minister Leo Varadkar has said he expects the EU to agree to an extension of the grace periods in order to allow “deep and meaningful” talks with Britain.


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Scotland’s £ 9bn Brexit as UK suffers drop in exports since leaving EU https://www.roddaandsons.com/scotlands-9bn-brexit-as-uk-suffers-drop-in-exports-since-leaving-eu/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/scotlands-9bn-brexit-as-uk-suffers-drop-in-exports-since-leaving-eu/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 04:00:03 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/scotlands-9bn-brexit-as-uk-suffers-drop-in-exports-since-leaving-eu/ The UK is the only country among its close European neighbors to have a negative trade balance on exports since the Brexit vote, new data has revealed. Figures from the House of Commons Library show that the UK has seen a 5.5% drop in exports since the 2016 referendum, when the country voted to leave […]]]>

The UK is the only country among its close European neighbors to have a negative trade balance on exports since the Brexit vote, new data has revealed.

Figures from the House of Commons Library show that the UK has seen a 5.5% drop in exports since the 2016 referendum, when the country voted to leave the European Union.

The SNP claimed statistics showed Brexit had already cost Scotland ‘billions of pounds’ and’ will continue to hit our economy, slashing Scotland’s GDP by up to £ 9 billion by now 2030 compared to EU membership ”.

Data shows that Ireland experienced the largest increase in its export trade balance of almost 50% from 2016 to 2021, while France recorded a surplus of 6.7% and Germany had a positive trade balance of 9.5% over the same period. .

When taking into account the impact of Covid-19 and the figures compared from 2020, the UK’s cumulative change of -19.3% is still the worst compared to 13 of its close European neighbors.

Of the top five countries that have maintained a positive trade balance since the EU referendum more than five years ago, three have a population size similar to or smaller than Scotland.

The top three countries that have maintained a positive export trade balance since the coronavirus outbreak are all similar in size to Scotland or smaller.

Data shows that in the first four months after the UK joined the European Economic Community in 1973, the forerunner of the European Union, the total value of the country’s goods exports increased by 16% per compared to the first four months of the previous year. .

In the first four months of 2021, the total value of UK goods exports fell by 11% compared to the first four months of 2020.

SNP MP Drew Hendry

READ MORE: SNP attacked for ignoring truck crisis that could ‘kill’ Scottish economy

SNP trade spokesman Drew Hendry said: ‘Far from boosting trade – as Boris Johnson and company told us – Brexit has seen UK exports decline and its trade balance s ‘collapse at worst in northwestern Europe.

“Brexit, which Scotland did not vote for, has already cost our country billions of pounds – and analysis shows it will continue to hit our economy, reducing Scotland’s GDP until to £ 9 billion by 2030 compared to EU membership. ”

He added: “Scotland deserves better than this. Three of the top five countries that have maintained a positive trade balance since the EU referendum, and the top three since the coronavirus outbreak, are similar in size or smaller than Scotland.

“This is a glimpse of what Scotland could do and be if we had the full powers of independence.

“It is increasingly clear that independence is the only way to protect Scotland from the long-term damage of Boris Johnson’s tough Tory deal on Brexit.”

But Scottish Tories have warned the SNP has no authority over trade and economics, saying the party “is betting on Scotland’s economic recovery by making a deal with an anti-business and anti-employment party. “, the Scottish Greens.

Conservative Constitution spokesman Donald Cameron added: “These are absurd comments, given that the SNP still has no solutions on how it would deal with Scotland’s growing budget deficit.

HeraldScotland: International Monetary Fund figures for cumulative net change in annual percentage changes in the volume of exports of goods and services between 2016 and 2021International Monetary Fund figures for the cumulative net change in annual percentage changes in the volume of exports of goods and services between 2016 and 2021

“60% of our trade is with the rest of the UK and the SNP has no answer on how it would replace that or the half a million jobs that depend on it.

“This nationalist coalition and its extreme policies will only hurt Scotland’s ability to recover from the pandemic.”

READ MORE: Rage over whiskey as SNP claims Brexit costs industry £ 5million per week

The SNP government has claimed that Scotland’s GDP could be 6% lower by 2030 than if the UK does not leave the EU.

An analysis released by the Scottish Government in June claimed that ‘overall merchandise trade in the UK has declined significantly, with total exports and imports dropping by £ 266.4 billion in the first four months of 2018 to £ 237.6 billion in the equivalent period in 2021 “.

The study added that “many Scottish companies have faced additional trade costs as a result of leaving the EU since the start of 2021”, noting that research “suggests that companies facing problems with export or import attribute the main cause of these difficulties to the end of the EU transition period and not the Covid-19 pandemic “.

He added: “According to HMRC, UK exports of food and live animals to the EU, which include seafood and fish, fell by 1.2 billion pounds (34%) over the course of of the first four months of 2021 compared to the equivalent period in 2018, with more stringent checks and certifications being one of the main reasons. ”

Economic experts from the Fraser of Allander Institute told the Herald that the new statistics show the UK has failed to see its exports recover from the pandemic, unlike its European and European neighbors.

Mairi Spowage, Deputy Director of the Fraser of Allander Institute, said: “In the statistics we can obviously see the rebound in other countries this year which is not happening overall for the UK.

“It’s quite difficult to say the impact at the moment because everything merges with Covid.

READ MORE: People are reportedly up to £ 2,800 a year in independent Scotland, new research finds

“We saw stocks of goods before December, then disruptions in exported goods, but most of the time that has recovered. These are the services for which the demand in the economy is still low and we are still seeing services at a low level. ”

She added: ‘If we talk again about plans for an independent Scotland, one of the problems they will have to solve is that obviously the trade with the rest of the UK is three times the size of the UK. rest of the EU, at least that was the case. before the pandemic.

“So it will really depend on trade agreements in any independent Scotland.”

In 2020, the UK’s exports of goods and services totaled £ 574 billion and imports totaled £ 586 billion – while the EU accounted for 42% of the country’s exports and 50% of imports.

The UK generally imports more than it exports, which means it has a trade deficit.

A deficit of £ 119bn on trade in goods was partially offset by a surplus of £ 107bn on trade in services in 2020. The UK’s overall trade deficit was £ 12bn in 2020.

A UK government spokesperson said: “The pandemic and restrictions across Europe have affected trade and depressed demand, so it is too early to draw firm conclusions about the long-term impact of our news. trade relationship with the EU and the rest of the world.

“We have made deals with countries which account for 64% of UK trade – worth £ 744 billion – and we are pursuing ambitious trade deals with countries like Australia, Japan and New Zealand as well as the £ 9 trillion Indo-Pacific Free Trade Area.

“We are helping Scottish businesses seize fantastic opportunities through free trade agreements and lower trade barriers. Earlier this year, we secured a suspension of retaliatory US tariffs on Scotch whiskey, and thanks to our new trade deal with Australia, distillers will also see the 5% tariff cut. ”


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The EU’s place in world trade in figures https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-eus-place-in-world-trade-in-figures/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-eus-place-in-world-trade-in-figures/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 20:54:58 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-eus-place-in-world-trade-in-figures/ View of the logo of Monte dei Paschi di Siena (MPS), the world’s oldest bank, facing massive layoffs as part of a proposed company merger, in Siena, Italy. REUTERS / Jennifer Lorenzini Four years after spending 5.4 billion euros ($ 6.3 billion) to save it, Rome is in talks to sell Monte dei Paschi (BMPS.MI) […]]]>

View of the logo of Monte dei Paschi di Siena (MPS), the world’s oldest bank, facing massive layoffs as part of a proposed company merger, in Siena, Italy. REUTERS / Jennifer Lorenzini

Four years after spending 5.4 billion euros ($ 6.3 billion) to save it, Rome is in talks to sell Monte dei Paschi (BMPS.MI) to UniCredit (CRDI.MI) and cut its stake from 64% in the Tuscan bank, writes Valentina Za, Reuters.

Here is a timeline of key events in the recent history of Monte dei Paschi (MPS), which made it the epitome of Italy’s banking nightmare.

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NOVEMBER 2007 – MPS acquires Antonveneta in Santander (SAN.MC) for 9 billion euros in cash, just months after the Spanish bank paid 6.6 billion euros to the Italian regional lender.

JANUARY 2008 – MPS announces a capital increase of 5 billion euros, a 1 billion euros convertible financial instrument called Fresh 2008, 2 billion euros of subordinated hybrid capital bonds and a bridging loan of 1.95 billion euros to finance the Antonveneta operation.

MARCH 2008 – The Bank of Italy, headed by Mario Draghi, approves the takeover of Antonveneta subject to the reconstitution of the capital of MPS.

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MARCH 2009 – MPS sells 1.9 billion euros of special bonds to the Italian Treasury to consolidate its finances.

JULY 2011 – MPS raises 2.15 billion euros in rights issue ahead of European stress test results.

SEPTEMBER 2011 – The Bank of Italy is providing € 6 billion in emergency liquidity to MPS via repo operations as the eurozone sovereign debt crisis worsens.

DECEMBER 2011 – The European Banking Authority fixes MPS’s capital shortfall at 3.267 billion euros as part of a general recommendation to 71 lenders to increase their capital reserves.

FEBRUARY 2012 – MPS reduces its capital requirements by € 1bn by converting hybrid capital instruments into shares.

MARCH 2012 – MPS posted a loss of 4.7 billion euros in 2011 after billions of goodwill write-downs on transactions including Antonveneta.

MAY 2012 – Italian police raided MPS headquarters as prosecutors investigate whether this misled regulators about the Antonveneta acquisition.

JUNE 2012 – MPS says it needs € 1.3 billion in capital to comply with the EBA recommendation.

JUNE 2012 – MPS asks the Italian Treasury to subscribe up to an additional € 2 billion in special bonds.

OCTOBER 2012 – Shareholders approve a € 1 billion capital increase intended for new investors.

FEBRUARY 2013 – MPS reports that the losses resulting from three 2006-09 derivative transactions amount to € 730 million.

MARCH 2013 – MPS lost 3.17 billion euros in 2012, penalized by the fall in the prices of its important Italian government bonds.

MARCH 2014 – MPS posted a 2013 net loss of € 1.44 billion.

JUNE 2014 – MPS raises € 5bn as part of a strongly discounted capital increase and repays € 3.1bn to the State.

OCTOBER 2014 – MPS appears to be the worst performing in stress tests at European level with a capital deficit of 2.1 billion euros.

OCTOBER 2014 – Former MPS Chairman, CEO and CFO is sentenced to three and a half years in prison after being found guilty of misleading regulators.

NOVEMBER 2014 – MPS plans to raise up to € 2.5 billion after stress test results.

JUNE 2015 – MPS raises 3 billion euros in cash after increasing the amount of its capital increase after recording a net loss of 5.3 billion euros for 2014 on record impairments of bad debts. It reimburses the remaining 1.1 billion euros of the special obligation subscribed by the State.

JULY 2016 – MPS announces new rights issue of 5 billion euros and plans to get rid of 28 billion euros of bad debt, as stress tests of European banks show it would have negative equity in the event crisis.

DECEMBER 2016 – MPS seeks state aid as part of a preventive recapitalization plan after the failure of its cash call. The ECB sets the bank’s capital requirements at 8.8 billion euros.

JULY 2017 – After the ECB declared MPS solvent, the European Commission clears the bailout at a cost of € 5.4 billion to the state in exchange for a 68% stake. Private investors contribute € 2.8 billion for a total of € 8.2 billion.

FEBRUARY 2018 – MPS posts profits in 2018, but says its updated projections fall short of restructuring targets agreed by the EU.

OCTOBER 2018 – MPS concludes the largest bad debt securitization transaction in Europe, eliminating € 24 billion of bad debt.

FEBRUARY 2020 – MPS posts a 2019 loss of € 1bn.

MAY 2020 – CEO Marco Morelli resigns urging Rome to find a partner for MPS as soon as possible. He is replaced by Guido Bastianini supported by 5 stars.

AOT 2020 – Italy is setting aside € 1.5 billion to help MPS as it strives to meet the mid-2022 reprivatization deadline.

OCTOBER 2020 – MPS shareholders approve a state-sponsored plan to reduce bad loans to 4.3% of total loans. Italy’s stake drops to 64% as a decree paves the way for its sale.

OCTOBER 2020 – A Milan court sentences the former CEO and chairman of MPS for false accounting in a surprise decision that forces MPS to increase provisions for legal risks.

DECEMBER 2020 – MPS says it needs up to € 2.5 billion in capital.

DECEMBER 2020 – Italy approves tax incentives for bank mergers resulting in € 2.3 billion advantage for MPS buyer.

JANUARY 2021 – MPS says it opens its books to potential partners.

FEBRUARY 2021 – MPS posts a loss of € 1.69 billion for 2020.

APRIL 2021 – Andrea Orcel takes over as director of UniCredit.

JULY 2021 – UniCredit begins exclusive talks with Italy’s Treasury to buy “selected parts” of MPS, a day before European bank stress test results show the smaller bank’s capital would be wiped out in a collapse.

($ 1 = € 0.8527)


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the draft strategy proposes more load pillars, lower electricity tariffs https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-draft-strategy-proposes-more-load-pillars-lower-electricity-tariffs/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-draft-strategy-proposes-more-load-pillars-lower-electricity-tariffs/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 11:10:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-draft-strategy-proposes-more-load-pillars-lower-electricity-tariffs/ Update at 13:22 with PN reaction A draft national strategy for public charging infrastructure for electric cars offers advantageous off-peak tariffs and incentives for the private sector to invest in public charging stations. The strategy aims to reduce carbon emissions by facilitating and financially owning electric cars, while preserving public health. The strategy was unveiled […]]]>

Update at 13:22 with PN reaction

A draft national strategy for public charging infrastructure for electric cars offers advantageous off-peak tariffs and incentives for the private sector to invest in public charging stations.

The strategy aims to reduce carbon emissions by facilitating and financially owning electric cars, while preserving public health.

The strategy was unveiled for public consultation on Wednesday by Energy Minister Miriam Dalli.

Enemalta CEO Jason Vella said Malta is working to become carbon neutral by 2050 with the aim of electrifying all cars within a few years.

He said this has significant environmental benefits and that Enemalta aims to offer preferential rates to consumers so that electric cars become the most beneficial choice.

Enemalta had set up an electric recharging pilot project, where lower electricity rates were offered during off-peak hours and 58% of consumers benefited from this program.

The CEO of the Board of Directors of the Energy and Water Services Regulator, Marjohn Abela unveiled new rates for all residential and non-residential categories.

Political advisor Abigail Cutajar spoke of the importance of supporting the transition to electric vehicles, including electrification and increasing the number of public transport, reducing carbon emissions to at least 19% by 2030 and the launch of a green paper for consultation.

She also mentioned that it is essential that charging facilities be offered in multiple locations – publicly, at home, en route and at the final destination. For this to be implemented, a national infrastructure is essential as well as the facilitation of installing home charging stations.

The vision, said Cutajar, is to provide a level playing field for the private sector through standardization of plugs, harmonization of prices, regularization of the market and licensing, and a distribution plan.

She also insisted on the concept of interoperability, where one operator can benefit from the service offered by another in order to improve accessibility.

Energy Minister Miriam Dalli stressed the need for a national policy for clean transport and that changes should take place regardless of the environmental obligations imposed by the EU.

She said Malta is still at a starting point with around 4,000 electric vehicles on the streets.

Dalli said the incentive should come from lower fees, so she sought help from the private sector, where they could also come up with public pricing pillars.

Through this program, operators must obtain a license for 10 years, and there will be a national registry, which will be accessible to the public.

She said the electricity prices that will be offered are among the most competitive in Europe and will be much cheaper than gasoline and diesel prices.

This policy, according to Dalli, will lead to better public health, more sustainable communities, more green jobs and reduced carbon emissions.

MaltaToday asked her about PN criticism that the Labor government is sacrificing public health for the benefit of the economy, when the government lobbied the EU to lower the carbon reduction target from 36% to 19%.

Dalli said the PN is not credible on the energy sector and that the Labor government is a pioneer in launching this national strategy.

She added that some EU countries still use coal-derived energy, while Malta has switched from using heavy fuel oil to cleaner natural gas.

PN reacts

PN spokesperson David Thake denounced the Energy Minister, insisting that what she announced was not new. Thake said the minister had not indicated how she intended to tackle existing problems, including the widespread lack of charging stations and the need to educate people on how to respect the use of charging stations.

“A new government led by Bernard Grech promises an adequate infrastructure for charging electric vehicles backed by a reliable distribution network,” Thake said.


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The United States and the United Kingdom could conclude “mini-agreements” before the FTA: “There is always an appetite! “| Politics | New https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-united-states-and-the-united-kingdom-could-conclude-mini-agreements-before-the-fta-there-is-always-an-appetite-politics-new/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-united-states-and-the-united-kingdom-could-conclude-mini-agreements-before-the-fta-there-is-always-an-appetite-politics-new/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 15:47:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/the-united-states-and-the-united-kingdom-could-conclude-mini-agreements-before-the-fta-there-is-always-an-appetite-politics-new/ Against all odds, Prime Minister Boris Johnson struck a trade deal with the EU at the end of December 2020, after nine months of tense negotiations. The deal was undoubtedly a huge triumph for the Prime Minister, who in 2019 won an overwhelming majority in the general election with the promise to ‘make Brexit happen’. […]]]>

Against all odds, Prime Minister Boris Johnson struck a trade deal with the EU at the end of December 2020, after nine months of tense negotiations. The deal was undoubtedly a huge triumph for the Prime Minister, who in 2019 won an overwhelming majority in the general election with the promise to ‘make Brexit happen’. Many wonder if he will now be able to make a similar move with the United States – the former mayor of London has put a deal with Washington at the heart of his plans to revive Britain after Brexit.

The election of Democratic President Joe Biden may have complicated things for him.

The new president has made it clear that he will not prioritize a deal with the UK.

Instead, Mr. Biden is adopting an “America First” policy similar to that of former President Donald Trump, fighting “like hell” to invest in American businesses and employees.

However, in an exclusive interview with Express.co.uk, a UK government business adviser, who wishes to remain anonymous, insisted that there is still an appetite for a UK business partnership in the US .

The adviser said: “Whenever there is a change of presidency, whatever the views of the new president, there is always a change in internal affairs.

“Inevitably this slows things down for everything else, but there is an appetite for a deal with the UK in the US … especially in areas such as agriculture and financial services.”

The advisor added: “What you’ll probably see is a series of deals.

“Not a full-fledged trade deal, but a series of mini-deals.

“You could have mutual recognition for a whole bunch of different areas in conformity assessment for different products.

“The United States and the United Kingdom could go much further in the equivalence type agreements of financial services where London and Washington trust each other much more than anywhere else in the world.

JUST IN: EU NI opening offer “violates Good Friday deal”

Former US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and outgoing EU Trade Commissioner Phil Hogan said in a joint statement: and reciprocal transatlantic trade, “

Mr Hogan wrote on his Twitter account that the pact “will increase market access for hundreds of millions of dollars in US and European exports.”

He added: “We have an agreement.

“The EU and the United States have agreed on a significant tariff reduction, the first in more than 20 years.

“The deal eliminates or reduces tariffs for 168 million euros (£ 150 million) in EU and US exports.”

Referring to the deal Brussels made with the Trump administration at the time, Sam Lowe, senior researcher at the Center for European Reform, wrote on Twitter: “When I said the UK and the states -United could do a mini trade deal this year, that’s the kind of thing I was talking about. “

Members of Congress were hoping the US and UK would strike a groundbreaking deal that is expected to be worth billions this year.

However, to have been rushed through Congress by Mr Biden, a deal should have been reached by July 1.

International Trade Secretary Liz Truss said the UK was focusing on getting the “right deal” with the US rather than a quick deal.


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Land of opportunity: more sustainable Australian agriculture … https://www.roddaandsons.com/land-of-opportunity-more-sustainable-australian-agriculture/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/land-of-opportunity-more-sustainable-australian-agriculture/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 20:12:16 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/land-of-opportunity-more-sustainable-australian-agriculture/ (MENAFN – The Conversation) European Union moves forward with border carbon taxes – taxes on carbon-intensive products from countries like Australia that have failed to take strong action to reduce emissions. The EU will impose such measures on a range of imported industrial materials, including aluminum, steel and cement. But what if these tariffs are […]]]>

(MENAFN – The Conversation) European Union moves forward with border carbon taxes – taxes on carbon-intensive products from countries like Australia that have failed to take strong action to reduce emissions. The EU will impose such measures on a range of imported industrial materials, including aluminum, steel and cement.

But what if these tariffs are one day applied to another key Australian export industry: agriculture? As National Farmers’ Federation chief executive Tony Mahar said last month:

In addition to a large greenhouse gas footprint from agriculture, Australia also has a truly terrible record when it comes to biodiversity loss. The argument for farmers to adopt more sustainable practices – and for governments to help with the transition – is becoming more and more compelling. Not only would this protect our exports, it would reduce emissions and help protect nature.

Australian agriculture must prepare for a more carbon-conscious future. Dean Lewins / AAP Imminent carbon tariffs

The EU policy, officially known as the Carbon Border Adjustment Measure, aims to protect local industries operating under the EU Emissions Trading System and other policies similar.

From 2026, European importers of certain commodities must purchase carbon certificates equivalent to the cost that would have been incurred had the goods been produced under the EU’s emissions trading system.

The measure aims to level the playing field – by protecting EU companies from competition from producers in countries that do not have carbon pricing regimes. The policy also puts pressure on exporting countries to implement their own effective emissions policies.

Read more: No need to complain, Australia will face carbon taxes unless it changes course

Australia does not export large volumes of industrial products to Europe, so the immediate effect of the carbon tariff will be small. However, in 2026 the EU will consider extending the scope of the measure to other products.

Carbon tariffs could also be imposed by other countries to which Australia exports, as they increasingly demand cleaner production of goods and as the principle of free trade appears to be losing importance. These tariffs could also apply to goods subject to regulation, in addition to emissions trading systems.

There is no immediate prospect of a carbon tariff on agriculture. But as many countries tighten their emissions targets until 2030 and adopt or strengthen net zero targets, agriculture could be part of the mix.

The carbon tariff at the EU border aims to protect European producers operating under a carbon price. OLIVIER HOSLET / EPA Carbon taxes on agriculture?

Agriculture accounts for around 13% of Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions. The main source of emissions is methane from cattle and sheep. Others include paddy fields, fertilizer use, agricultural waste, and fuel use.

The industry is clearly sensitive to the problem. The National Farmers Federation has endorsed a net zero economy-wide “aspiration”. It also calls for investments in carbon neutral agricultural technologies to, among other objectives, develop new export markets. Meat and Livestock Australia has set a 2030 carbon neutral target for the red meat industry.

If Australia’s major trading partners apply carbon tariffs on agricultural products in the future, Australian farmers will have a strong incentive to make production less emission intensive. Potential ways to achieve this include:

  • better management of soils and native vegetation cover
  • less fertilizer use
  • switch to low-emission sheep and cattle breeds
  • feed additives that cause livestock to emit less methane
  • switch from ruminants to other sources of meat, such as kangaroo.

Such measures can lead to an increase in agricultural productivity.

Australia can avoid a carbon tariff on agricultural exports in two ways. First, agriculture can adopt cleaner production methods and have its products certified as low-emission products. Second, the federal government can implement a comprehensive emissions reduction policy, which in agriculture could mean minimum production standards to avoid high emission practices or a carbon price wherever possible. .

The existing Emissions Reduction Fund would not avoid carbon tariffs. Indeed, it only applies to participating companies and it subsidizes emission reduction projects rather than imposing obligations on those that generate emissions.

Read more: Carbon pricing works: Biggest study ever, no doubt

Feed additives can reduce methane emissions. PAA Tariffs on biodiversity loss?

In the future, environmental tariffs may well extend to a wider set of environmental damages, such as loss of biodiversity.

Australia’s record in terms of species extinction is truly appalling, including in the agricultural landscapes which have been greatly altered.

Some countries are already using financial incentives to reduce damage to nature. For example, the UK government’s plans would require farmers to demonstrate environmental improvements to receive farm subsidies.

A major challenge for the agricultural sector is to simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve biodiversity outcomes. There are proven, science-based ways to do this, such as:

  • protect patches of remaining native vegetation that provides habitat for animals and helps attract and store carbon from the atmosphere
  • create healthy agricultural dams that can provide better quality drinking water for livestock, improve agricultural productivity and create wildlife habitat
  • plant “windbreaks” – strips of woody vegetation that protect livestock from wind and sun, provide wildlife habitat (when properly designed and managed), and prevent loss of soil moisture.

This integrated approach to agricultural production, climate change mitigation and biodiversity conservation is explored and championed by the Australian National University’s Sustainable Farms project.

Changes in the management of farm dams can improve biodiversity and agricultural production. Peter Lorimer / AAP Sustainable Australian agriculture

The Australian government has recognized the need to find agricultural solutions to climate change and biodiversity loss. For example, she is currently developing a stewardship program to encourage farmers to improve environmental conditions on their land.

A crucial part of this and similar programs will be to establish reliable systems to estimate and certify agricultural emissions and biodiversity outcomes. Indeed, a solid long-term follow-up is essential for such programs to be considered as credible, at the national and international levels.

The opportunities are ripe for Australian farmers to adopt much more environmentally sustainable land management practices and in doing so safeguard or even expand Australian agricultural exports.

Read more: Australian farmers want more climate action – and they’re starting in their own (huge) backyard

The conversation

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How free is New Zealand trade? https://www.roddaandsons.com/how-free-is-new-zealand-trade/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/how-free-is-new-zealand-trade/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 18:39:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/how-free-is-new-zealand-trade/ The government tells exporters they need to diversify, but for many, the lack of tariffs when exporting to China makes it too attractive to want to look elsewhere. National correspondent Lucy Craymer examines where New Zealand has free trade agreements and where there are potential opportunities. What we have: China Signed in 2008, and updated […]]]>

The government tells exporters they need to diversify, but for many, the lack of tariffs when exporting to China makes it too attractive to want to look elsewhere. National correspondent Lucy Craymer examines where New Zealand has free trade agreements and where there are potential opportunities.

What we have:

China

Signed in 2008, and updated earlier this year – although the latter has yet to be signed by the two governments – it’s the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) that gets a big chunk of airtime in New Zealand. It was the first FTA that China signed with a developed country and gave us a head start on exporting our agricultural products there.

By 2018, tariffs had been removed on around 97% of the goods New Zealand sent to China and improved access to Chinese markets for New Zealand service providers. the band for exporters has been reduced.

All of this saw merchandise exports with China quadruple from 2008 levels when the FTA was signed.

READ MORE:
* What New Zealand is expected to gain from its post-Brexit trade deal with Britain
* A Biden presidency could be better for New Zealand, but big foreign policy challenges won’t go away with Trump
* Warnings from China using trade as a hollow ring weapon

The upgrade will give some New Zealand products – such as seafood – faster access to Chinese markets and reduce tariffs for paper and wood products entering China.

New Zealand and China signed an FTA upgrade in January.

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Tr / Fourni

New Zealand and China signed an FTA upgrade in January.

Australia

Australia is New Zealand’s only official ally. It is also New Zealand’s closest trading partner.

And the economic and trade relationship between Kiwi-Oz is recognized as one of the closest, widest and most compatible in the world, according to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Both countries are committed to a single economic market that makes it easier for businesses to work in either market and cuts costs for them.

Australia is our second largest trading partner as goods and services crossing the divide.

Singapore and New Zealand have had a free trade agreement for two decades.

Annabelle Liang / AP

Singapore and New Zealand have had a free trade agreement for two decades.

Singapore

Signed in 2000 – and implemented in 2001 – this FTA won the award for one of the fastest concluded, with less than a year of negotiation. This has boosted trade between the two countries, with Singapore now New Zealand’s largest trading partner in Southeast Asia.

An upgrade went into effect in 2020. This allows New Zealanders to stay three times as long in the city without needing a visa, as well as increased rights for companies to send staff there and a streamlining of staff. customs and simplification of border requirements.

Other FTAs ​​in Asia

New Zealand has a number of other agreements with countries or cities in the region, including Hong Kong, Malaysia, Korea and Thailand. It is also part of a trade agreement that covers the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) – Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam and the Philippines – as well as Australia. ASEAN is New Zealand’s fifth largest trading partner and is considered to have enormous potential for New Zealand business and investment due to the combined size of the population and gross domestic product (GDP) of all country. An improved ASEAN-NZ-Australia agreement is currently under negotiation.

PACER More

The intriguingly named PACER-Plus agreement between New Zealand, Australia and a number of Pacific Islands has established a common set of trade rules, which will make it easier for businesses to trade across the region. It lowers tariffs, makes it easier to determine what qualifies as Pacific Island product, and allows exporters to move their products to New Zealand and Australia.

Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership

It involves Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. The controversial agreement gives New Zealand better market access for signatories to the agreement and reduces tariffs on products, and it allows better access to New Zealand, for countries that have also signed on. Prior to that, New Zealand did not have an FTA with four of the signatories: Japan, Canada, Mexico and Peru.

This partnership replaced the failed Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, which was concluded but was never ratified after the US withdrawal.

The Nelsonians have shown their opposition to signing the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Trade Agreement.

LUZ ZUNIGA

The Nelsonians have shown their opposition to signing the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Trade Agreement.

Soon maybe :

Comprehensive regional economic partnership

The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership is a trade agreement between 15 economies in the Asia-Pacific region that are home to nearly a third of the world’s population and absorb more than half of New Zealand’s exports. It was signed in 2020 and will come into force once all the governments of the countries have enacted it. According to the government, this is expected to increase New Zealand’s GDP by around $ 2 billion per year.

UK

The two countries are currently in fast-track negotiations to reach an agreement, after Australia and the United Kingdom who reached one earlier this year. New Zealand Trade Minister Damien O’Connor has said it is expected to be reached by August this year. This deal has been touted as eliminating some tariffs and creating meaningful trade access from day one. The UK is currently the country’s sixth largest trading partner and over a 15-year period it is estimated that a deal would increase exports by 40%.

Trade Minister Damien O'Connor is bumping elbows with UK Trade Secretary Liz Truss during their meeting in London earlier this year.

LIZ TRUSS / Twitter

Trade Minister Damien O’Connor is bumping elbows with UK Trade Secretary Liz Truss during their meeting in London earlier this year.

European Union

The EU and New Zealand have so far accumulated 11 rounds of negotiations (most recently in July) with the aim of signing an FTA between the two parties. In June, O’Connor traveled to Paris and Brussels to boost political momentum. There is no time frame for when this could be agreed. A report prepared by the EU before negotiations began estimated that a deal could see New Zealand’s exports to the region increase by 10.5 to 22.2 percent.

Pacific Alliance

Negotiations continue between New Zealand and the Latin American regional group of Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru. The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said that although trade with the Alliance is currently modest, New Zealand sees considerable opportunity to expand. The hope of the agreement is to establish free trade with Colombia and further reduce the obstacles that affect exports to Chile, Mexico and Peru, as some sectors, especially agriculture, are highly protected in the Pacific Alliance.

World Trade Organization Electronic Commerce Agreement

New Zealand, with more than 80 members of the World Trade Organization, confirmed in January 2019 its intention to launch negotiations on trade-related aspects of e-commerce. New Zealand is involved because it believes that despite unprecedented growth in e-commerce, the development of international trade rules has not kept pace. The ability to move data between jurisdictions is also increasingly crucial for businesses involved in international trade and is an inevitable feature of the modern economy.

Back burner :

A falling out between Qatar and its neighbors, now re-established, is partly responsible for delays in New Zealand's signing of an FTA with the Gulf Cooperation Council.

Michael Steele / Getty Images

A quarrel between Qatar and its neighbors, now restored, is partly responsible for delays in New Zealand’s signing of an FTA with the Gulf Cooperation Council.

United States

The Trump administration was set to start formal trade talks with New Zealand on a long-awaited free trade deal in 2020 – until the pandemic broke and two elections hit, the former said United States Ambassador to New Zealand Scott Brown. Those talks would likely have resulted in a digital services free trade deal with the world’s largest economy, potentially worth hundreds of millions of dollars to the two countries.

Gulf Cooperation Council

Agreed in principle in 2009, this FTA languished without ratification for an exceedingly long period. This has not been helped by Qatar’s falling out with its neighbors in the Middle East. This would however be extremely beneficial for New Zealand given the growing wealth of the region and the lack of agricultural resources.

Russia-Belarus-Kazakstan

Negotiations were suspended in 2014 following Russia’s actions regarding Ukraine and Crimea. Comments that they would restart in 2018 were put on ice after a former Russian military officer and British secret service double agent was poisoned. However, all three countries provide a great opportunity for New Zealand given the country’s demand for dairy products.

India

The pursuit of a free trade agreement with the second most populous country on the planet has been at the heart of New Zealand’s approach to India for much of the past decade, but now people both sides seem ready to admit defeat.


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Vodafone to restore roaming charges in Europe from January https://www.roddaandsons.com/vodafone-to-restore-roaming-charges-in-europe-from-january/ https://www.roddaandsons.com/vodafone-to-restore-roaming-charges-in-europe-from-january/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 15:06:00 +0000 https://www.roddaandsons.com/vodafone-to-restore-roaming-charges-in-europe-from-january/ The move follows a similar EE announcement in June (Photo: Getty / Rex) Vodafone has confirmed that it will become the latest mobile network to reintroduce roaming charges for Britons traveling to Europe after Brexit, despite its promise not to do so. The U-turn means some customers will have to pay up to £ 2 […]]]>
The move follows a similar EE announcement in June (Photo: Getty / Rex)

Vodafone has confirmed that it will become the latest mobile network to reintroduce roaming charges for Britons traveling to Europe after Brexit, despite its promise not to do so.

The U-turn means some customers will have to pay up to £ 2 a day to use their monthly allowance for data, calls and texts in other European countries, starting in January.

Roaming charges for tourists ended in June 2017, meaning mobile phone users could continue to use their devices in EU countries at no additional cost – as long as they stick to it. a “fair use” limit.

The Brexit trade deal said the two sides should “cooperate to promote transparent and reasonable tariffs” for mobile phone charges, but did not guarantee that free roaming would continue.

Although network providers were able to recoup the charges once the UK left the EU, four of the biggest providers – EE, O2, Three and Vodafone – have said they have no plans to do so.

But, in June, BT-owned EE became the first to announce the reintroduction of roaming charges.

Vodafone following their desire to raise concerns that other suppliers would do the same.

A Vodafone store in the center of Markt Schwaben, Bavaria.

Vodafone previously said it would not reintroduce roaming charges (Photo: Getty Images)

Holidaymakers using Vodafone will be able to reduce the cost to £ 1 per day by purchasing a multi-day pass for eight or 15 days.

Subscribers to the company’s more expensive Xtra plans will still have roaming included, while the Republic of Ireland will be exempt for all customers.

Vodafone said less than half of its customers were roaming beyond the Republic of Ireland in 2019.

A spokesperson said: “Rather than affecting all of our customers by including additional roaming costs in all of our tariffs, customers will be able to choose a plan with roaming included, or purchase an additional roaming pass.

“Our ambition is to ensure that customers never experience a ‘bill shock’ when roaming with Vodafone, as all of our plans and plans will have clear usage limits, and customers will also be able to set their own. limits via Vodafone Spend Manager, which is free to configure via the My Vodafone app. ‘

Those who remain on their existing tariff plan will not be affected until they make changes.

Paolo Pescatore, analyst for PP Foresight, said consumers should expect other providers to do the same.

He said: “Phone users will now need to be more savvy when traveling on board.

“Some will have roaming included on more expensive plans and premium devices, while others will be forced to consider switching to wifi and subscribing to local e-sim options.”

Contact our press team by sending us an email at webnews@metro.co.uk.

For more stories like this, see our news page.

MORE: UK faces ‘worst food shortages since war’ due to Covid and Brexit


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